new works by Thilo Heinzmann

His works with pigment, for example, display that powdery dust, they exhibit it in its material concreteness, as one of the many specimens of matter that make up our world; but they also transform it into chromatic fields, exploring its wide yet subtle palette, letting color perform as it should after it has been freed of the burdens of representation. 




Thilo Heinzmann

Cloud Clear Horizon
August 28 - September 27, 2014 

Galerie Perrotin, Hong Kong, is pleased to announce “Cloud Clear Horizon”, Thilo Heinzmann’s first solo show in Asia.  Heinzmann is a painter in the emphatic sense of the word, fully invested in reinventing and recalibrating that medium’s capacities, while keeping a keen eye on that artform’s rich history. One of the central tenets of Heinzmann’s work lies in revisiting painting’s Western tradition with both of its prime historical momentums in view: painting as the superior medium for showing the world; and, after it had achieved its momentous triumph in retreating to its own means, painting as the field for a powerful interaction of form, color, texture, surface, after the rupture of abstraction. Heinzmann’s work revisits this epochal break and harnesses it into a dichotomy that his art elegantly puts into play.  His works with pigment, for example, display that powdery dust, they exhibit it in its material concreteness, as one of the many specimens of matter that make up our world; but they also transform it into chromatic fields, exploring its wide yet subtle palette, letting color perform as it should after it has been freed of the burdens of representation. (text taken from here)








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DISC Interiors in LA Times  

"I want my home to be beautiful,  but I don't want it to be precious." 





DISC Interiors featured in the LA Times!

"Many of our clients seek modern furnishings in their Spanish homes," said DISC Interiors. "With the ceiling height and beams, Spanish homes really lend themselves to modern furnishings."  Modern touches in Chow's traditional home include brass stick lighting by New York designer Billy Cotton, faux paneling wallpaper in the guest room by Obilis, a custom cloud chandelier by Apparatus in the dining room and a graphic bed and headboard upholstered with Japanese-inspired Templeton fabric.






"The eclectic mix includes striking mirrors by Mexico-based Casamidy and modern furnishings by young New York designers like the Egg Collective. 












A chance to re-think the California "light and space" movement.

"I was no longer in the water but rather I was high above the water and looking down upon it. The sky, that had been so grey and lowering, was iridescent with indescribable beauty. 
Waves of ecstatic and delicate color vibrated around me and lulled me to a sense of peace beyond comprehensions." - Robert Kyle Beggs Case-Book of Astral Projection





"I think the descriptions of near-death experience, descriptions of light phenomena in the dream, and in waking ... I don't pretend to have a religious art, but I have to say, it is artists who worked that territory from the very beginning." —James Turrell, 1999  

“CLEAR” brings together works by twenty-three contemporary artists exploring subjects reflective, transitory, crystalline, or celestial by traversing concepts of clarity sourced from art history, science, and esotericism.  The late 1960s saw the emergence of the California Light and Space Movement, tangential to Minimalism, with protagonists such as James Turrell, Larry Bell, and De Wain Valentine. They created works predicated on the extrasensory potential of light by using the space within and around it as an immersive frame, heightening the viewer’s awareness of the mind-body experience. “CLEAR” imagines a continuation of this narrative, suggesting astral projection—leaving one’s physical body to inhabit an “astral” one—as an endgame. The exhibition explores apertures both material and conceptual, as well as the rich sensibilities that visualize the science and fantasy of aesthetic experience and popular imagination.

via Gagosian



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new paths emerging
aka
"when exterior becomes interior"

"The transitions between inside and outside, culture and staged nature, become fluid and transitory – and the progress of the visitor through the museum becomes a central issue.








I once had mountains in the palm of my hand 
Rivers that ran through every day 
But I must have been mad, never knew what I had  
'Til I threw it all away (Madeline Peyroux)



1. Olafur Eliasson Riverbed 20.8.2014 - 4.1.2015

"Olafur Eliasson's take on Louisiana is radical, fascinating and unique. The central work in the first solo exhibition at the museum by the Danish-Icelandic artist is a huge, sitespecific project that reverses the relation between nature and art.  The transitions between inside and outside, culture and staged nature, become fluid and transitory – and the progress of the visitor through the museum becomes a central issue. Eliasson’s exhibition is an enhancement of our gaze at the museum, at ourselves and at the world.  Olafur Eliasson's exhibition at Louisiana engages with the museum’s unique identity. The exhibition consists of three sections that each thematize the encounter between Eliasson’s art and Louisiana as a place. The central work, Riverbed (2014), is based on the unique connection between nature, architecture and art that characterizes the museum. Transforming the entire South Wing into a rocky landscape, Eliasson focuses on inhabiting space in a new way and inserts new patterns of movement into the museum. (via here)

2. Staircase image, source currently unknown.

3. YOU by Urs Fisher :"Urs Fischer has reduced Gavin Brown’s Enterprise to a hole in the ground, and it is one of the most splendid things to have happened in a New York gallery in a while. Experientially rich, buzzing with energy and entropy, crammed with chaos and contradiction, and topped off with the saga of subversion that is central both to the history of the empty-gallery-as-a-work-of-art but also to the Gavin Brown experience itself, this work is brimming with meaning and mojo. It was also a Herculean project.

In a very minimalist yet surreal and expressionistic way, You makes space palpable. Initially the chasm dominates your vision and takes over the room, like Magritte’s painting of a giant green apple filling space. As your vision adjusts, your inner ear goes into high gear as you realize that while standing at floor level you’re no longer at the base of the gallery but halfway up the walls. The room transforms into something unmoored, like a Tiepolo or Correggio painting. As you survey everything from this unfamiliar perch, your eye takes over and details come into focus. This I-can-see-everything realism echoes the experience of paintings by Ingres and David.  "

via here, in 2007.
image via here.


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Miri Mara Ceramics, Carpinteria, California 

I think I'm going back to California 
Somewhere distant and it's all far away 
It's so far, it's so far far away  
I think I'll drift across the ocean now. (Mazzy Star, California) 



works displayed at Miri Mara, including an original lamp design


 Last week I traveled up to Santa Barbara, racing the morning light as it danced across the grinning Pacific Ocean. Along the way I stopped into Miri Mara, a small ceramics studio and gallery in Carpinteria, a beach town (which is the home to the world's largest pine tree! seen here.)   The gallery and studio is next to an automotive store, and Miri Mara is home in an industrial brick building that is built-out with drift wood.  Earthy black and white ceramics displayed on exquisite surfaces casting shadows and creating quiet conversations in the small shop.  

The works are created using a slip-casting technique, a once popular form to create ceramic works here in the U.S. We received a wonderful tour from the assistant who demonstrated the subtle shifts of surface techniques that can be achieved using brushes, teeth, and combs.  

Beautiful works! - David John




inside the back studio of Miri Mara






more information via here.

Clouds look so clear in your eyes 
Let me dream all my, let me dream all my friends  
I think I'll fly across the ocean 
I can watch the sky turning grey 
I think I'm going back, I think I'll go back  
I think I hear the whisper of my own best friend
 I think I hear the bells ringing in the square California, California 
 


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the works of  Takeshi Omura 

"I don't wanna be alright. I don't wanna feel just "OK". 
I wanna see everything. I wanna go everywhere. 
I wanna settle down, hey lover. 
I wanna run away, daydreamer..." (Neil Halstead)






 "Look for ocean walls, to gaze upon 
These distance stars, yeah, these distance suns 
Are all the reasons, are all the reasons 
The only season in my life" (Neil Halstead "Seasons)

"After graduating from the Arts & Sciences and Ceramics program at Tajimi Technical High school, Takeshi Omura studied under well known potter, Keisuke Iwata. In 2007, after severals years of producing his work at "Studio MAVO" in Tajimi, Omura returned to Fukuoka where he set up his own kiln. Omura's ceramics are characterized by their thin, almost metal like quality and unique coloration."

more info here. 





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 Hélène Binet – Looking at Historic Architecture

"The light and shadow of the observatory in Jaipur is telling us the time, the seasons, predicting the monsoon but also positioning the human being in relation to very big dimension. The light and the shadow as a tool to understand the world. In the Couvent Sainte-Marie de la Tourette, light and shadow are the path to the liturgies and the only ornament in the cell of the father. They are collected in a little box, maybe a place to catch dreams.” 



Hélène Binet – Looking at Historic Architecture

September 5 till November 6, 2014 

Gallery Gabrielle Ammann will present a solo exhibition of selected works of the internationally renowned photographer Hélène Binet. Acclaimed for her depictions of contemporary architecture, Hélène Binet is equally intrigued in historical structures and has photographed important buildings from all over the world. The astronomical observatory Jantar Mantar in Jaipur, India is remarkable not only for its historic and scientific importance but also because it was influential to Le Corbusier and his later work. Built between 1724 and 1734 by Maharaja Jai Singh II, each structure at Jantar Mantar is an architectural astronomical instrument. The site is a surreal mélange of edifices designed in accordance with astronomical aspects using shadow and light for measurement. Binet’s photographs capture the dreamlike quality of the structures as well as highlights the significant use of shadow and light in order to develop the architectural landscape of the site.







As Binet recounts from her visit: “The light and shadow of the observatory in Jaipur is telling us the time, the seasons, predicting the monsoon but also positioning the human being in relation to very big dimension. The light and the shadow as a tool to understand the world. In the Couvent Sainte-Marie de la Tourette, light and shadow are the path to the liturgies and the only ornament in the cell of the father. They are collected in a little box, maybe a place to catch dreams.”






The inspiration of the simplicity of forms and the play of light and shadow at Jantar Mantar is evident in Le Corbusier’s work at Chandigarh and his sacral buildings. Considered masterpieces of modern architecture, Le Corbusier’s sacred structures are the Sanctuary of Notre-Dame-du-Haut at Ronchamp (1954), the Dominican Monastery of Sainte-Marie de la Tourette (1960) and the posthumously completed Church of Saint-Pierre in Firminy-Vert (2007). Light takes a key position in Le Corbusier´s buildings, it is also the central point in Binet´s graphically arranged compositions. She reveals the spirit of the spaces through light, shadow and texture. Her photographs evoke the sculptural quality of the spaces through the contrast between curved and straight surfaces and the interplay of light and shadow. 

more info here.

DISC Interiors : Sunset Idea House 
Opens August 1st- September 7, Manhattan Beach , CA 

"Ceramics, paintings, textile weavings and custom furniture commissioned from L.A.-area makers and artisans give personality to the voluminous interior spaces."




2014 Sunset Idea House Kitchen : blackened oak custom cabinetry, Lawson Fenning stools, Forrest Lesch-Middelton ceramic tiles for the backsplash, baskets from Garde, 
ceramics on open shelving by Heather Rosenman



Sunset Idea House featured in the LA Times today about the Sunset Idea House!

"David John and Krista Schrock, partners in Los Angeles-based DISC Interiors, brought an effortless, contemporary vibe to the interiors, drawing inspiration from the nearby Pacific Ocean and California coastline.

 "We wanted the interiors to feel modern and beach-driven but not in the typical Cape Cod motif of seashells or anchors," DISC said. The designers played up graphic contrasts with oversized black-and-white photography of ocean scenes and selected warm finishes such as natural linens, baskets and white oak flooring. Ceramics, paintings, textile weavings and custom furniture commissioned from L.A.-area makers and artisans give personality to the voluminous interior spaces.

Manhattan Beach architect Louie Tomaro of Tomaro Design Group is the home's designer. Sunset selected Mike Davis Custom Homes, also based in Manhattan Beach, to build the project. Masterpeace Gardens of Redondo Beach designed the landscape with drought-tolerant plantings, a no-mow lawn, an edible garden, an outdoor kitchen and living room, and a swimming pool."


Read Full article here... 



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new work by Brion Rosch

I know you had it hard 
I know you had it hard 
I know you had it hard and you wanted to tell me 
Oh I don't want to hear it " (Electrelane)

"Brion Rosch’s creative process, which involves searching for, manipulating and layering found materials, is evocative of the archaeological process of digging for evidence of a lost culture.  The people of the Nazca culture, who flourished from 100 BC to 600 AD on the southern coast of Peru, didn’t leave a historical record in the form of a written language."










Brion Rosch has become not only a friend (although we've never met...), but an artist I've come to deeply admire. I've watched Brion's work over the past 5 years take many turns, but each is an attempt to express the inexpressible, to make connections to something this is not present, or a thought that has yet to form. His gestures and language often border on the intentionally ridiculous, but always are bold and assured, and upon first glance, perhaps that is their sword. Over time, his work has revealed a quiet confidence, and a willingness for flirty comparison with other modernist artists grappling with form, color, gesture, connection, and the void. - David John


BRION NUDA ROSCH: FORMS & OBJECTS JULY 18—AUGUST 30, 2014 


Adams and Ollman is pleased to present Forms & Objects, an exhibition of new work by Brion Nuda Rosch on view with a selection of Pre-Columbian Peruvian ceramics.  Rosch’s assemblages—made with materials that are humble in origin and slightly altered or transformed—are presented on pedestals where they defy easy categorization as paintings or sculptures, insignificant or monumental. These poetic, slight works works, united by a single color—a deep, earthy red-brown— and dominated by a simple shape—a rectangle, irregular and often missing a corner, are ambiguous in form and meaning, yet call to mind signposts that mark and highlight the ancient objects in the room.  

United by several themes, across time, place and intention, Rosch's contemporary works and the Pre-Columbian Peruvian pottery are found, fragmented, abstract, and guided by rule and ritual. Rosch’s creative process, which involves searching for, manipulating and layering found materials, is evocative of the archaeological process of digging for evidence of a lost culture.  The people of the Nazca culture, who flourished from 100 BC to 600 AD on the southern coast of Peru, didn’t leave a historical record in the form of a written language. Their cups, vases, and effigy forms, while highly abstract, contain illustrations of anthropomorphic creatures and ritualistic trophy heads that provide us with insight into these ancient peoples. Similarly, a central shape—a paired down head or bust—pushes Rosch's works into the realm of figuration. 







Brion Nuda Rosch Blank Form, 2014 acrylic, paper on found book page 11 x 9 inches



"Working within the context of Pre-Columbian Peruvian pottery, Rosch further expands his practice of constructing or reconstructing narrative and identity through objects. Together, they gesture towards a reconsideration of the historical material and our relationship to the object and its history.

How much can we know from what little we are given? 
What have we unearthed and how can we piece it together? 
What do we value and what do we hold sacred?"



 



Brion Nuda Rosch This Form is Intentionally a Form to Potentially Represent a Portrait, 2014 acrylic, paper, artist frame, wood 19 x 15 3/4 x 2 1/2 inches



Adams and Ollman 
811 East Burnside #213 
Portland, Oregon 503.724.0684  



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new LA design gallery:  HILDEBRANDT STUDIO

"In Search of Modern features examples of seminal work by modernist designers, architects, furniture makers and ceramicists and it engages the contemporary viewer in a discourse on design during the modern industrial boom, a socially progressive era and a trend of thought that affirmed the power of human beings to create, improve and reshape their environment with the aid of practical experimentation, scientific knowledge and technology." 






In Search of Modern  
 July - August, 2014 

HILDEBRANDT STUDIO is pleased to announce In Search of Modern, a collective exhibition reflecting on the notion of form and function in American and European design during the 20th century. The title of the exhibition stems from Marcel Proust’s novel “A la Recherche du Temps Perdu (In Search of Lost Time)”, a prominent literary work of the 20th century. Certain affinities with the novel can be found at the core of this exhibition, in the sense that the focus of the novel, much like the focus of this exhibition, is not necessarily on the development of a coherent evolution, but rather on a multiplicity of perspectives, and on the formation of experience. In Search of Modern features examples of seminal work by modernist designers, architects, furniture makers and ceramicists and it engages the contemporary viewer in a discourse on design during the modern industrial boom, a socially progressive era and a trend of thought that affirmed the power of human beings to create, improve and reshape their environment with the aid of practical experimentation, scientific knowledge and technology. The rise of modern design to public prominence indicates that the distance in perspective between modernism and contemporary is less than often assumed. 

This exhibition contributes to the ongoing process of absorbing one of the most influential and inventive times in design and architecture. The exhibition features the work of: Gae Aulenti, Eileen Gray, Greta Grossman, Charles and Ray Eames, Charles Pollock, Paul McCobb, Milo Baughman, Ben Seibel, Hans Wegner, Torbjorn Afdal, Robert Maxwell, David Cressey, John Follis, Malcom Leland and La Gardo Tackett.   







HILDEBRANDT STUDIO 
5880 Blackwelder Street 
Los Angeles, CA 90232 
Gallery Hours: 12-7 pm 
Tuesday - Saturday By Appointment Only 




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DISC Interiors : 
Sunset Idea House 2014: Manhattan Beach
Project photos.  Opens August 1

 

Kid's room mural in progress: by Londubh Studio


We've been working on this project for almost a year now, and we are excited that we are in the final stretch!  Our version of the modern beach house opens to the public August 1 in Manhattan Beach.  We are excited to be working with so many talented artists, ceramicists, painters, lighting designers, and carpenters. More pics to come, along with all the contributors. - David John

Follow our process on Sunset Magazine's site here.




kitchen islands pendants and cabinetry installation




dark stained floor to ceiling cabinetry



 Sabine Hill Cement tile with marble and white oak cabinetry for the master bathroom




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Ryuichi Sakamoto 
vs 
Lucio Fontana






An attempt to connect sounds with vision.


1. "Like his home country of Japan, Ryuichi Sakamoto can be categorised completely objectively under one word: pioneering. He's an old man now, but whilst many might associate age with being stuck in the past or unable to change, Sakamoto has led his career on exactly opposite principles. Born in 1952, he's lived a life that's found it's own chronological parallels in music. As a young boy learning piano, he became fascinated by Debussy. As a teenager, he found himself listening to The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and later on - much to the disapproval of his classical teachers - electronic pioneers like Kraftwerk." text via here.

2. Concetto Spaziale, Attese, executed in 1960, is an important work in the oeuvre of Lucio Fontana that has been an undeniable highlight in Andy Warhol’s collection until his death in 1987. It is an outstanding example of the work to come out of the Spazialismo (Spatialism) movement, founded by the artist in 1947. Six carefully remeditated cuts run across the thinly painted monochromic canvas, emphasising the physicality of this work. It is charged with energy of the physical act of the artist slashing the surface with the knife. This physical act or gesture became the central idea of Spatialism, to the extent that it figured in the movement’s ‘First Spatial manifesto’: “it doesn’t matter to us if a gesture, once accomplished, lives for a second or a millennium, for we are convinced that, having accomplished it, it is eternal” (in E. Crispolti and R. Siligato, eds., Lucio Fontana, Milan, 1998, p. 118). Through the use of gesture, Fontana was in fact one of the first artists to perceive art as a performance. In the ‘Technical Manifesto of Spatialism’, Fontana elaborates on Spatialism’s ambitions: “Painted canvas no longer makes sense… What is needed… is a change in both essence and form. It is necessary to go beyond the painting, sculpture and poetry… In the praise of this transformation in the nature of man, we abandon the use of known forms of art and move towards the development of an art upon the unity of space and time” (in M. Gooding, Abstract Art, London, 2001, p. 88). via here.



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Lean out, lean out 
The light in Who wants to sing? 
And I truly believe 
Used see what you see 
That you cant overlie us 
We will find the solution 







And that we,and that we,and that we 
We shall see what you see 
We shall see what you see


1. Mark Rothko
2. Peter Zellner's Matthew Marks Gallery in West Hollywood CA
3. Hundred Water's latest album is pure magic. A feast for the eyes, ears, and heart.


"Music is one of the dominant ways of experiencing being alive and so in a way, it’s more than just hearing. It’s about articulating feelings, stories and attitudes. I also feel as though an album or a piece of music almost has a sense of place inside it if it’s good. It takes a lot out of you to really apprehend music fully so I think it does relate to the other senses.

Music for me is story telling, so I usually start with an intention or something I want to say. From there I kind of struggle around in the dark, trying to find ways to say that. Sometimes it’s a linear thing where I have an idea and then go about trying to find ways to express it. Other times I will discover things along the way and the idea ends up turning into something else altogether. It’s a mixture between intention and chance.   

I think the reason I write music is because I’m trying to say things that I find difficult to encapsulate verbally. Music is its own kind of language and it’s very good at saying things that words struggle with, so that’s often the impulse for me. " - Max Richter, composer,  taken from an interview here.




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